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Parabolic Stress Skin construction - Open Knowledge — LiveJournal

Aug. 9th, 2008

12:40 am - Parabolic Stress Skin construction

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Original: craschworks - comments

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From:reichart
Date:August 9th, 2008 05:31 pm (UTC)
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Cool design and concept.

We need "mass" housing solutions though.


Someone needs to build a house frame system in metal, that can be shipped in parts. You order it, you assemble it, you pour the liquids in (concrete, etc.), pop off the mold, ship the parts to the next location.

I just rebuilt my pool system. The filter finally died (32 years old!). And one of the tricks to my design is that I have no extra elbows. So I get REALLY great water pressure. My neighbor has 13 elbows, I have 1.

One of my other tricks is to use screw on connectors (Slip unions)

http://www.plumbingsupply.com/images/pvc-fitting-457-slip-union-sxs.jpg

The problem is, there is not BLOODY STANDARD! So I have 5 different types since each company sells a different design. Bastards!

We waste so much time not simply adopting teamwork.

Here is a cool blog/site I found while searching for the image of the PVC connector

http://www.simplifiedbuilding.com/blog/category/diy/page/2/

Check out the plywood table. I designed a plywood desk hutch for a competition when I was a teen…one piece. I came in 3rd, of 300+ plus entries though.

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From:crasch
Date:August 10th, 2008 01:19 am (UTC)
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We need "mass" housing solutions though.

Someone needs to build a house frame system in metal, that can be shipped in parts. You order it, you assemble it, you pour the liquids in (concrete, etc.), pop off the mold, ship the parts to the next location.



There are commercial products such as insulated concrete forms (ICF's) where it works such as you described:

http://www.tridipanel.com/content/view/24/207/
http://www.polysteel.com/products.htm
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Insulating_concrete_forms

The advantage to the system in the video is that it has an even lower material cost than the ICF systems, and is not limited to the shapes specified by the ICF manufacturers.

Simplified building is a cool site. Have you seen the playatech site?

http://www.playatech.com/



Edited at 2008-08-10 01:19 am (UTC)
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From:reichart
Date:August 10th, 2008 08:59 pm (UTC)
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Yup, familiar with all of it.

The plywood game is fun, but a 2x2 is an AMAZING invention, and when added to plywood (even without fastener, it is work its weight in GOLD, which is still cheap).

So while I enjoy the "plurity" of the playawood, I would rather mix a few simple technologies in exchange for much greater strength, and more adaptable design.

"After the concrete has cured, or firmed up, the forms are left in place permanently for the following reasons:"

Which is the opposite of what I'm suggesting. If you had access to really good steel parts, that can be oiled down (old motor oil is best in fact), poured, and then popped off, it would make the remaining structure metrically accurate. Everything would fit perfectly.

Then you send the forms to the next person on the list. Each person just pays for the shipping, and a use fee goes to the company the makes the original parts.

It is a really great idea. If each piece is under 30kg, then a single person can move them around.

Today I'm working on my pond filter system. I looked at a bunch of designs (both professional, and DIY on the web). Everyone uses too many parts. They have bad design, that is not easy to repair. People just don't think ahead.


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From:crasch
Date:August 12th, 2008 05:01 am (UTC)
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If you had access to really good steel parts, that can be oiled down (old motor oil is best in fact), poured, and then popped off, it would make the remaining structure metrically accurate. Everything would fit perfectly.


Check this out:

http://www.americanheritage.com/articles/magazine/it/1996/3/1996_3_50.shtml

I'm guessing that you have in mind casting a smaller unit than Edison was trying.

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From:reichart
Date:August 12th, 2008 06:20 am (UTC)
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Yeah, I studied his work ( I have several dozen books on concrete starting with books I bought back in the 70s).

I'm stunned this technology has not taken off.

If you want to be inspired by smart designs, of course start with Frank Lloyd Wright (who used to cure his concrete parts on trains that had eccentric wheels to vibrate the concrete as it cured (brilliant). He built spires to prove he could carry the largest loads, and was as dramatic as P.T. Barnum in his presentations, piling on bags of cement far beyond what people believed could be supported.

But if you want to be in awe, search on Robert Maillart. When you drive over a freeway overpass of his design you often think it was ade in modern times (perhaps the late 60s or early 70's). Search on his water towers, and my favourite…and evidence of my belief in simple homes.

One of his designs (sadly, I could not find you an example on the Web), is a hyperbolic tunnel made of concrete so thin to its height weight strength ratio, it looked like paper, but lasted decades… He used a unique trick to fit the mesh inside the concrete perfectly.

Of course, there is the inflatable bladder concepts, which will probably win in the long run.


Found this, just simply odd fun, http://deputy-dog.com/2007/12/29/the-forgotten-sound-mirrors/




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