June 1st, 2002

bswing

What's Your Intuition?

http://www.fastcompany.com/online/38/klein.html

What's Your Intuition?

Cognitive psychologist Gary Klein has studied people who make do-or-die decisions. His advice? Forget analysis paralysis. Trust your instincts.

by Bill Breen
illustrations by Brian Cronin
from FC issue 38, page 290

It's Saturday afternoon in midsummer. A man named Gary Klein sits in a Cleveland fire station, waiting for the next alarm to blare. Klein, 56, is a cognitive psychologist -- a cartographer of the human mind who maps how people perceive and observe, think and reason, act and react. He has left the sterile setting of the laboratory, where his peers scrutinize humans as if they were rats in a maze, in order to investigate real people operating in the real world.


Klein and his research team are attempting to crack a mystery that has intrigued psychologists for decades: How do people who work in unpredictable situations make life-and-death decisions? And how do they do it so well? According to decision-making models, they should fail more often than they succeed. There is too much uncertainty and too little time for them to make good choices. Yet again and again, they do the right thing. Klein wants to know why.

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bswing

Demarchy: A Democratic Alternative to Electoral Politics

http://www.uow.edu.au/arts/sts/bmartin/pubs/92kio.html

Published in Kick It Over, No. 30, Fall 1992, pp. 11-13.

Demarchy: A Democratic Alternative to Electoral Politics
Brian Martin

email: brian_martin@uow.edu.au

Australian philosopher John Burnheim has invented the term "demarchy" to describe a political system without the state or bureaucracies, and based instead on randomly selected groups of decision makers.

Burnheim decided that the word democracy is so corrupted in meaning that it was better to introduce a different word for his proposed alternative. Although democracy literally means rule by the people, those Western societies commonly called democracies actually give the people little role in self-government. Admittedly, people are able to vote for political leaders, but only at infrequent intervals. They are certainly not able to vote for powerful figures in corporations and government bureaucracies.

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