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I Love You, Because You're Just Like Me - Open Knowledge — LiveJournal

Jun. 30th, 2003

08:08 pm - I Love You, Because You're Just Like Me

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Super! Now all I got's to do is find me an anarchocapitalist, extropian gun chick from Idaho who wants to have her head cut off and frozen before she dies...

Courtesy of ch

http://news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story2&cid=594&u=/nm/20030630/hl_nm/mates_similarities_dc&printer=1

I Love You, Because You're Just Like Me

By Alison McCook

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Despite the saying that opposites attract, new research released Monday suggests that people tend to prefer someone more like themselves.

Reviewing responses from questionnaires about mate preferences from almost 1,000 heterosexual young adults, researchers found that people tend to prefer someone who resembles them on certain key traits, such as those related to social status, wealth and parenting.

Study author Dr. Peter M. Buston of the University of California in Santa Barbara told Reuters Health that choosing someone as a mate who is similar to you makes good evolutionary sense.

"Individuals choose partners who are similar to themselves on many characteristics, because that contributes to the stability of the partnership, and that, in turn, contributes to the number of children they might have in their lifetime," Buston said.



Buston conducted the research, published in the early edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (news - web sites), while at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York.

During the study, Buston and his co-author Dr. Stephen T. Emlen handed out questionnaires to 978 heterosexuals between 18 and 24 living in Ithaca. Questions focused on how important people said certain traits were in potential mates, and how well they embodied those same traits themselves.

The study featured 10 attributes, all related to wealth and status, physical appearance, family commitment and sexual faithfulness.

In an interview, Buston said that researchers have often suggested that all women -- regardless of their own personalities -- tend to gravitate toward men who embody specific traits related to how well they can support a family, such as wealthy men and those with high social status. In turn, all men have been supposed to flock toward women with youth and vigor, who appear especially fertile, Buston said.

In the current study, however, Buston and Emlen found that men and women tended to prefer mates who embodied the same qualities as they did.

For example, Buston said that women who rated their own physical appearance highly tended to prefer men who were also good looking more strongly than men who had the stereotypically attractive traits of wealth and high social status.

Buston noted that people may believe opposites attract as a result of a "some very obvious, unique cases" where seemingly mismatched people form unions.

However, "when you look across the population as a whole ... it's more that likes attract," Buston said.

Keeping that principle in mind may help people who are seeking a potential mate, he added.

Many people get caught up in what they believe to be the "ideal mate," Buston said -- who is often very wealthy and attractive -- and get "locked into" thinking that is what they should look for.

However, according to these findings, the ideal mate may be different for every person, Buston noted.

"If what people are looking for is a stable, long-term partnership, then they should just be looking for someone who is similar to themselves in many things," Buston said.

SOURCE: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences 2003;10.1073/pnas.1533220100.

Comments:

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From:electricia
Date:June 30th, 2003 05:17 pm (UTC)
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I know someone who fits that bill, except for the Idaho part.

I guess you know her, too, come to think of it.
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From:crasch
Date:June 30th, 2003 05:59 pm (UTC)
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Yep. If we're thinking of the same person, I think that she knows that I'm interested, but we currently live in distant cities. I haven't yet figured out a way to either a) move closer, yet retain enough present and future social capital to win her love b) make it worth her while to move closer to me.
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From:futuregirl
Date:June 30th, 2003 05:31 pm (UTC)

Oh.

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I'm in Wisconsin and I want my whole body frozen. Sorry, we are just incompatible.
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[User Picture]
From:crasch
Date:June 30th, 2003 05:54 pm (UTC)

Re: Oh.

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Darn. All the good ones are whole body.
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From:ex0teric
Date:June 30th, 2003 07:16 pm (UTC)

Re: Oh.

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I think I love you!
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From:futuregirl
Date:June 30th, 2003 07:43 pm (UTC)

Re: Oh.

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Thanks. Want to join my fan club? ;-)
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From:ex0teric
Date:June 30th, 2003 09:20 pm (UTC)

Re: Oh.

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Sure, why not! XD
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[User Picture]
From:crasch
Date:July 1st, 2003 10:44 am (UTC)

Re: Oh.

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So what are the membership requirements of this fan club? Is cheese involved?
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[User Picture]
From:crasch
Date:July 1st, 2003 10:46 am (UTC)

Re: Oh.

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BTW, why whole body? Any technology that can repair the damaged caused by aging/disease/cryopreservation is going to be able to grow you a new one. Neuros cost 1/3rd less, require less maintenance, and are much easier to move safely should the need arise. (At least one patient is probably still in suspension as a result of the ability to move her head quickly.)
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From:futuregirl
Date:July 1st, 2003 01:19 pm (UTC)

Re: Oh.

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Because my boobs wanna see the future, too.
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From:crasch
Date:July 1st, 2003 01:24 pm (UTC)

Re: Oh.

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Sentient boobs! You're right, we wouldn't want to lose them.
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[User Picture]
From:jozafiend
Date:July 5th, 2003 11:43 am (UTC)

Re: Oh.

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If you go whole body, there is more DNA material to work with if you should happen to need it. Also, evidence suggests that the spine contains important information. Wouldn't want to leave that out!

The Cryonics Institute does whole body for about as much as Alcor does neuros and is as good as Alcor, if not better imo.
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[User Picture]
From:crasch
Date:July 5th, 2003 01:06 pm (UTC)

Re: Oh.

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There's plenty of DNA in the skin on the skull (or the brain itself) for any plausible future scenario requiring it.

The spine may contain some information, but I don't think it contains any information that I'm likely to miss. The main thing quadraplegics seem to missing is ability to control their limbs, and I think that will be easibly repairable in the future.

I worked at 21st Century Medicine for 2 years. Among my co-workers were Brian Wowk (president of Cryo-care, one of the original authors of Cryonics: Reaching for Tomorrow) and Mike Darwin (former president of Alcor). 21CM is funded by Saul Kent and Bill Falloon, who have served on the boards of directors of Alcor and Cryo-care. So my opinion should be taken with a grain of salt. However, I must take issue with the claim that "CI...is as good as Alcor, if not better..."

CI is able to charge less because a) they don't have their own "stand-by" team trained and ready to perform cryopreservation immediately after legal death b) they historically have done much less research than Alcor c) they make less conservative assumptions about the likely rate of growth of capital d) they don't (directly) offer vitrification to their members.

Will it matter? Since no one has ever been recovered from cryopreservation yet, it's impossible to say that CI's practices are insufficient, or that Alcor is wasting money on efforts that won't make any difference.

However, having seen first hand the damage that traditional glycerol cryopresevation causes (the technique used by CI) vs. vitrification (technique used by Alcor), I definitely want my brain vitrified.

That said, if one can't afford to be cryopreserved by Alcor, being cryopreserved by CI is better than no cryopreservation at all.
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[User Picture]
From:jozafiend
Date:July 8th, 2003 09:28 am (UTC)

Re: Oh.

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You've definitely done more research on this, but these were some of my thoughts.

The spine is necessary if you have muscle memory skills like playing the piano, martial arts, something of that nature where your muscles are trained to respond without thought. Many people wouldn't miss it, but it's something to consider which I never see in the literature.

I thought the vitrification process was highly experimental at best. Now I don't really know what's involved and haven't looked into it. I suppose I should do so before signing up with anyone.

The other points I liked about CI which brought costs down were that they used mortuary-level sterilization, not hospital level sterilization, and the fact that they own the land on which they built their business unlike Alcor. I have never heard of their less conservative assumptions and would be interested to know more.

For the non-scientist, it's a lot of work to check out the backgrounds and mailings lists for key information to make the decision. And everyone seems to be biased. But thanks for the input!
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From:ex0teric
Date:June 30th, 2003 07:20 pm (UTC)
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I want one of those too. 'cept in Utah or maybe Minnesota. And whole body.
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[User Picture]
From:crasch
Date:July 1st, 2003 10:46 am (UTC)
(Link)
Why whole body? Any technology that can repair damaged caused by aging/disease/cryopreservation is going to be able to grow you a new one. Neuros cost 1/3rd less, require less maintenance, and are much easier to move safely should the need arise. (At least one patient is probably still in suspension as a result of the ability to move her head quickly.)
(Reply) (Parent) (Thread)
From:ex0teric
Date:July 1st, 2003 09:02 pm (UTC)
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Honestly, I think I just feel more comfortable having the whole body right now. Maybe that'll change by the time I can afford to sign up for Alcor and pay life insurance and whatnot... giving it a few seconds of reflection it does not seem likely that there is anything critical sentience-wise (other than basic life-sustaining functions) outside of the head.
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